Mt. St. Helens Eruption

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Mt. St. Helens Eruption

May 18 @ 8:32 am

On March 20, 1980, Mount St. Helens experienced a magnitude 4.2 earthquake;[2] and, on March 27, steam venting started.[26] By the end of April, the north side of the mountain had started to bulge.[27] On May 18, a second earthquake, of magnitude 5.1, triggered a massive collapse of the north face of the mountain. It was the largest known debris avalanche in recorded history. The magma in St. Helens burst forth into a large-scale pyroclastic flow that flattened vegetation and buildings over 230 square miles (600 km2). More than 1.5 million metric tons of sulfur dioxide were released into the atmosphere.[28] On the Volcanic Explosivity Index scale, the eruption was rated a five, and categorized as a Plinian eruption.

Mount St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980, at 08:32 Pacific Daylight Time.

The collapse of the northern flank of St. Helens mixed with ice, snow, and water to create lahars (volcanic mudflows). The lahars flowed many miles down the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, destroying bridges and lumber camps. A total of 3,900,000 cubic yards (3,000,000 m3) of material was transported 17 miles (27 km) south into the Columbia River by the mudflows.[29]

For more than nine hours, a vigorous plume of ash erupted, eventually reaching 12 to 16 miles (20 to 27 km) above sea level.[30] The plume moved eastward at an average speed of 60 miles per hour (100 km/h) with ash reaching Idaho by noon. Ashes from the eruption were found collecting on top of cars and roofs the next morning as far as the city of Edmonton in Alberta, Canada.

Lava dome growth profile from 1980–1986

By about 5:30 p.m. on May 18, the vertical ash column declined in stature, and less severe outbursts continued through the night and for the next several days. The St. Helens May 18 eruption released 24 megatons of thermal energy;[3][31] it ejected more than 0.67 cubic miles (2.79 km3) of material.[3] The removal of the north side of the mountain reduced St. Helens’ height by about 1,300 feet (400 m) and left a crater 1 mile (1.6 km) to 2 miles (3.2 km) wide and 0.5 miles (800 m) deep, with its north end open in a huge breach. The eruption killed 57 people, nearly 7,000 big game animals (deerelk, and bear), and an estimated 12 million fish from a hatchery.[8] It destroyed or extensively damaged over 200 homes, 185 miles (298 km) of highway and 15 miles (24 km) of railways.[8]

Between 1980 and 1986, activity continued at Mount St. Helens, with a new lava dome forming in the crater. Numerous small explosions and dome-building eruptions occurred. From December 7, 1989, to January 6, 1990, and from November 5, 1990, to February 14, 1991, the mountain erupted with sometimes huge clouds of ash.[32]

Details

Date:
May 18
Time:
8:32 am
Event Categories:
,

Organizer

Mother Nature aka USGS.GOV
Phone:
(360) 993-8900
Email:
smoran@usgs.gov
Website:
https://www.usgs.gov/natural-hazards/volcano-hazards/observatories

Venue

Mt. St. Helens Dome
WA United States + Google Map